World Plant A Vegetable Garden Day

World Plant A Vegetable Garden Day

is observed annually on April 22 to promote the planting and eating of vegetables. The event was created by the National Gardening Association in the United States in honor of Earth Day.

The goals of World Plant A Vegetable Garden Day are to:

Promote the planting and eating of vegetables.

Educate people about the benefits of vegetables.

Encourage people to grow their own vegetables.

The benefits of vegetables include:

They are a good source of nutrients, including fiber, vitamins, and minerals.

They can help you maintain a healthy weight.

They can help reduce your risk of heart disease and some types of cancer.

They are low in calories and fat.

They can be enjoyed in many different ways.

So if you want to be healthy, help the environment, and enjoy some delicious food, join the rest of the world in celebrating World Plant A Vegetable Garden Day!

Vegetable Garden Planter Box Diy

Materials:

-1″x6″x8′ pine board

-1″x3″x8′ pine board

-1″x2″x8′ pine board

-1/4″x48″x96″ plywood

-1″x6″x8′ cedar board

-1″x3″x8′ cedar board

-1″x2″x8′ cedar board

-1″x1″x8′ cedar board

-1/4″x48″x96″x1/2″ hardboard

-1″x6″x8′ redwood board

-1″x3″x8′ redwood board

-1″x2″x8′ redwood board

-1/4″x48″x96″x1/4″ hardboard

-1″x6″x8′ treated lumber

-1″x3″x8′ treated lumber

-1″x2″x8′ treated lumber

-1″x1″x8′ treated lumber

-1″ galvanized corner braces

-1-1/4″ galvanized screws

-1-1/4″ deck screws

-1″ roofing nails

-1″x4″x8′ treated lumber

-1″x6″x8′ treated lumber

-1″x8″x8′ treated lumber

-1/4″x48″x96″x3/4″ hardboard

-3/4″x3″x8′ treated lumber

-1/4″x48″x96″x1/4″ hardboard

-1″x4″x8′ cedar board

-1″x6″x8′ cedar board

-1″x8″x8′ cedar board

-1/4″x48″x96″x1/4″ hardboard

Tools:

-Circular saw

-Power drill

-3/8″ drill bit

-1/2″ drill bit

-5/16″ drill bit

-Paint or wood sealer

-Stapler

-Hammer

-Tape measure

-Level

-Chisel

-Pry bar

-Paint brush

-Cordless drill

-1/4″ hole saw

-1-1/4″ hole saw

-1-1/2″ hole saw

-3/4″ hole saw

-1″ hole saw

-1-1/4″ hole saw

-1-1/2″ hole saw

-2″ hole saw

-4″ hole saw

-6″ hole saw

Instructions:

1. Cut the boards.

a. Cut the 1″x6″x8′ pine board into (2) 48″ lengths and (2) 24″ lengths.

b. Cut the 1″x3″x8′ pine board into (2) 48″ lengths.

c. Cut the 1″x2″x8′ pine board into (4) 24″ lengths.

d. Cut the 1/4″x48″x96″ plywood into (2) 48″x96″ sheets.

e. Cut the 1″x6″x8′ cedar board into (2) 48″ lengths and (2) 24″ lengths.

f. Cut the 1″x3″x8′ cedar board into (2) 48″ lengths.

g. Cut the 1″x2″x8′ cedar board into (4) 24″ lengths.

h. Cut the 1″x1″x8′ cedar board into (8) 12″ lengths.

i. Cut the 1/4″x48″x96″x1/2″ hardboard into (2) 48″x96″ sheets.

j. Cut the 1″x6″x8′ redwood board into (2) 48″ lengths and (2) 24″ lengths.

k. Cut the 1″x3″x8′ redwood board into (2) 48″ lengths.

l. Cut the 1″x2″x8′ redwood board into (4) 24″ lengths.

m. Cut the 1/4″x48″x96″x1/4″ hardboard into (2) 48″x96″ sheets.

n. Cut the 1″x4″x8′ treated lumber into (4) 48″ lengths.

o. Cut the 1″x6″x8′ treated lumber into (2) 48″ lengths and (2) 24″ lengths.

p. Cut the 1″x8″x8′ treated lumber into (4) 24″ lengths.

2. Assemble the sides.

a. Drill 1/4″ pilot holes in the ends of the following boards: (2) 48″ lengths of 1″x6″ pine, (2) 48″ lengths of 1″x3″ pine, (2) 24″ lengths of 1″x2″ pine, and (1) 48″x96″ sheet of 1/4″x48″x96″ plywood.

b. Assemble the sides of the planter box by using 1″ galvanized corner braces and 1-1/4″ galvanized screws.

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c. Drill 1-1/4″ holes in the corners of the following boards: (2) 48″ lengths of 1″x6″ cedar, (2) 48″ lengths of 1″x3″ cedar, (2) 24″ lengths of 1″x2″ cedar, (1) 48″x96″ sheet of 1/4″x48″x96″ hardboard, (1) 48″x96″ sheet of 1/2″x48″x96″ hardboard, (4) 24″ lengths of 1″x4″ treated lumber, (2) 24″ lengths of 1″x6″ treated lumber, (2) 24″ lengths of 1″x8″ treated lumber, and (1) 24″ length of 3/4″x3″ treated lumber.

d. Drill 1-1/4″ holes in the centers of the following boards: (2) 48″ lengths of 1″x6″ cedar, (2) 48″ lengths of 1″x3″ cedar, (2) 24″ lengths of 1″x2″ cedar, (1) 48″x96″ sheet of 1/4″x48″x96″ hardboard, (1) 48″x96″ sheet of 1/2″x48″x96″ hardboard, (4) 24″ lengths of 1″x4″ treated lumber, (2) 24″ lengths of 1″x6″ treated lumber, (2) 24″ lengths of 1″x8″ treated lumber, and (1) 24″ length of 3/4″x3″ treated lumber.

e. Apply wood sealer to all sides of the following boards: (2) 48″ lengths of 1″x6″ cedar, (2) 48″ lengths of 1″x3″ cedar, (2) 24″ lengths of 1″x2″ cedar, (1) 48″x96″ sheet of 1/4″x48″x96″ hardboard, (1) 48″x96″ sheet of 1/2″x48″x96″ hardboard, (4) 24″ lengths of 1″x4″ treated lumber, (2) 24″ lengths of 1″x6″ treated lumber, (2) 24″ lengths of 1″x8″ treated lumber, and (1) 24″ length of 3/4″x3″ treated lumber.

3. Assemble the bottom.

a. Drill 1/4″ pilot holes in the ends of the following boards: (1) 48″ length of 1″x4″ treated lumber, (1) 48″ length of 1″x6″ treated lumber, (1) 48″ length of 1″x8″ treated lumber, (1) 24″ length of 3/4″x3″ treated lumber, and (1) 48″x96″ sheet of 1/4″x48″x96″ hardboard.

b. Assemble the bottom of the planter box by using 1″ galvanized corner braces and 1-1/4″ galvanized screws.

c. Drill 1-1/4″ holes in the centers of the following boards: (1)

Vegetable Garden Plant Compatibility Chart

When planting a vegetable garden, it is important to choose plants that will grow well together and not compete for resources. The Vegetable Garden Plant Compatibility Chart below can help you make the best choices for your garden.

The chart is divided into three sections: vegetables that grow well together, vegetables that should not be planted together, and vegetables that are incompatible.

Vegetables that grow well together:

Tomatoes and basil are a classic pairing. Both plants need plenty of sunlight and warm temperatures, and they compliment each other’s flavors.

Carrots and lettuce are another good pairing. Lettuce grows well in cool weather, while carrots prefer warmer temperatures. The two plants also don’t compete for resources, since they grow at different depths in the soil.

Tomatoes and peppers are a good pairing, because both plants need lots of sunlight and warmth. The peppers will provide some shade for the tomatoes, and the tomatoes will help keep the peppers warm at night.

Vegetables that should not be planted together:

Broccoli and cauliflower should not be planted together, because they both need cool weather to grow well. If they are planted together, one or both of the plants will likely not produce any vegetables.

Beets and potatoes should not be planted together, because they both compete for the same nutrients in the soil. The beets will steal the nutrients from the potatoes, and the potatoes will steal the nutrients from the beets.

Carrots and onions should not be planted together, because the onions will steal the nutrients from the carrots.

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Vegetables that are incompatible:

Zucchini and pumpkins should not be planted together, because the zucchini will steal the nutrients from the pumpkins.

Corn and beans should not be planted together, because the beans will steal the nutrients from the corn.

When Should I Plant A Vegetable Garden

There is no single answer to this question, as the best time to plant a vegetable garden depends on your climate and the vegetables you want to grow. However, as a general rule, you should plant vegetables in the spring or fall, depending on your location.

In the spring, you should plant vegetables as soon as the soil can be worked, which is typically in late February or early March in most parts of the country. If you live in a warm climate, you can plant vegetables later in the spring, as long as the temperature does not exceed 85 degrees Fahrenheit.

In the fall, you should plant vegetables in late September or early October, before the first frost. If you live in a warm climate, you can plant vegetables in the fall, but they may not produce as many vegetables as plants in colder climates.

There are several things to consider when deciding when to plant a vegetable garden. First, you need to know what vegetables can be grown in your climate. Second, you need to choose vegetables that are suited to the season. For example, spring is a good time to plant vegetables such as lettuce, peas, and carrots, while fall is a good time to plant vegetables such as broccoli, cauliflower, and kale.

Finally, you need to consider your own schedule. If you are busy in the spring and fall, you may want to plant vegetables that can be harvested early, such as lettuce or peas, so you can harvest them before they go to seed. If you have more time in the summer, you may want to plant vegetables that take longer to mature, such as tomatoes or zucchini.

Planting A Vegetable Garden In Clay Soil

Clay soil is a type of soil that is common in the eastern United States. It is heavy and dense, making it difficult to work with. However, if you are able to garden in clay soil, there are a few things you can do to make it more hospitable to plants.

One thing you can do is to add organic matter to the soil. This will help to loosen the soil and improve its drainage. You can add organic matter in the form of compost, manure, or leaf mold.

Another thing you can do is to till the soil. Tilling will help to break up the clay and improve the drainage.

If you have a lot of clay soil, you may want to consider growing plants that are adapted to these conditions. Plants that do well in clay soil include aster, black-eyed Susan, cardinal flower, Joe-Pye weed, and Turk’s cap lily.